Members

56 effective members of the historic company founded in 1850, the first Alpine Guide company born in Italy and second in the world. 38 Alpine Guides regularly practice their activity on all the mountains of the world by discovering their companions / friends roaring the secluded corners of our planet. Many are instructors for the formation of the Italian Alpine Guides and others are Alpine Guides Emergency instructors

Argentero Luca

Guida Alpina


Bassanini Giovanni

Guida Alpina


Bellini Alessandro

Guida Alpina


Boschiazzo Alberto

Guida Alpina


Brocherel Dario

Guida Alpina


Bruni Niccolò

A. Guida Alpina


Buccella Rudy

Guida Alpina


Bulgarelli Luca

Guida Alpina


Campedelli Alex

Guida Alpina


Campese Stefano

Guida Alpina


Cesa Christian

Guida Alpina


Chanoine Armando

Guida Alpina


Clavel Arnaud

Guida Alpina


Datrino Massimo

Guida Alpina


Favre Sergio

Guida Alpina


Ferraris Luca

Guida Alpina


Gianchini Massimo

Guida Alpina


Glarey Valerio

Guida Alpina


Glassier Stefano

Guida Alpina


Grange Edy

Guida Alpina


Grivel Andrè

Guida Alpina


Jacquemod Attilio

Guida Alpina


Joyeusaz Edmond

Guida Alpina


Marra Gianluca

Guida Alpina


Mochet Mario

Guida Alpina


Ollier Alessandro

Guida Alpina


Palmet Edmondo

Guida Alpina


Passino Giorgio

Guida Alpina


Pellin Matteo

Guida Alpina


Pellissier David

Guida Alpina


Petigax Giuseppe

Guida Alpina


Picco Pietro

A. Guida Alpina


Plat Andrea

Guida Alpina


Ravello Mario

Guida Alpina


Rolli Luca

Guida Alpina


Saccaro Edoardo

Guida Alpina


Signò Giulio

Guida Alpina


Taiola Oscar

Guida Alpina


Tamponi Marco

Guida Alpina


Torretta Anna

Guida Alpina


Truchet Corrado

Guida Alpina


Villa Giuseppe

Guida Alpina


Zappelli Marco

Guida Alpina


Honorary Guides

I nostri soci onorari:

Lamperti Massimo


Montalbetti Fabio


Paolo Corio


Scalisi Rino


Zucco Giuliano


Emery Guides

16 are the Emerite Alpine Guides who have made the history of Alpine Guides and Alpinism first on the Alps and then on the other mountains of the World.

Bigio Vittorio

Guida Alpina


Brazzale Gianfranco

Guida Alpina


Clavel Ottone

Guida Alpina


Cosson Lorenzino

Guida Alpina


Grivel Walter

Guida Alpina


Mareliati Luciano

Guida Alpina


Michiardi Maggiorino

Guida Alpina


Ollier Attilio

Guida Alpina


Ollier Cesare

Guida Alpina


Pellin Ruggero

Guida Alpina


Pennard Edoardo

Guida Alpina


Petigax Renato

Guida Alpina


Pramotton Luigi

Guida Alpina


Trial Guides

2 Alpine Guides and 4 Alpine Guides are finishing their 3-year trial period, which will allow them (officially accepted by the Assembly of Actual Partners) to become officially members of the prestigious Courmayeur Alpine Guide Company.

Argentero Luca

Guida Alpina


Bassanini Giovanni

Guida Alpina


Bellini Alessandro

Guida Alpina


Boschiazzo Alberto

Guida Alpina


Brocherel Dario

Guida Alpina


Bruni Niccolò

A. Guida Alpina


Buccella Rudy

Guida Alpina


Bulgarelli Luca

Guida Alpina


Campedelli Alex

Guida Alpina


Campese Stefano

Guida Alpina


Cesa Christian

Guida Alpina


Chanoine Armando

Guida Alpina


Clavel Arnaud

Guida Alpina


Datrino Massimo

Guida Alpina


Favre Sergio

Guida Alpina


Ferraris Luca

Guida Alpina


Gianchini Massimo

Guida Alpina


Glarey Valerio

Guida Alpina


Glassier Stefano

Guida Alpina


Grange Edy

Guida Alpina


Grivel Andrè

Guida Alpina


Jacquemod Attilio

Guida Alpina


Joyeusaz Edmond

Guida Alpina


Marra Gianluca

Guida Alpina


Mochet Mario

Guida Alpina


Ollier Alessandro

Guida Alpina


Palmet Edmondo

Guida Alpina


Passino Giorgio

Guida Alpina


Pellin Matteo

Guida Alpina


Pellissier David

Guida Alpina


Petigax Giuseppe

Guida Alpina


Picco Pietro

A. Guida Alpina


Plat Andrea

Guida Alpina


Ravello Mario

Guida Alpina


Rolli Luca

Guida Alpina


Saccaro Edoardo

Guida Alpina


Signò Giulio

Guida Alpina


Taiola Oscar

Guida Alpina


Tamponi Marco

Guida Alpina


Torretta Anna

Guida Alpina


Truchet Corrado

Guida Alpina


Villa Giuseppe

Guida Alpina


Zappelli Marco

Guida Alpina


The Alpine Guide Craft

Mountaineering with an Alpine Guide means learning to go on a mountain safely and having fun. There are notable differences between going to the mountain with an Alpine Guide and going to friends: so we think it useful to give some information about it.

The work of the Alpine Guide

The craft of the Alpine Guide is mainly practical. The Alpine Guides teach the climbing, mountaineering and mountain climbing techniques in a mountain environment so that people can learn how to enjoy themselves. It's not always that easy, because the high mountain environment with its complexity often makes certain decisions taken by the guide can not be interpreted without proper experience: the experience is personal and is conveyed with a frequent attendance of the high mountain.

Security and Risks

The Alpine Guide operates mainly in hazardous environments, handles risk and teaches how to handle it. Prudence is rigorous in the mountains as even riding, while adopting all the knowledge at its disposal, can not undo the objective dangers of the mountain (eg falling rocks or cherries). When we make a hike in the mountains, we accept that zero risk does not exist. One of the parameters related to risk management is the personal technical level of customers: choosing a course appropriate to their technical and physical capabilities (SEE ALSO PAGE LEVELS), allows to minimize exposure to subjective dangers. Risk management is part of our work and, in addition to managing it directly, we will teach you to analyze and understand your risk level to assess whether it is acceptable or not. At the same time, we believe that no one, including the Alpine Guides, should be put under pressure to take on unacceptable risks.

Number of people each Alpine Guide

Small groups mean Effectiveness, Consistency and Improved Risk Management. In our mountaineering courses the maximum number of participants per guide ranges from six people for the easier programs, down to one person for higher level programs. The group size is based on risk management assessments. A narrow group of participants in rock climbing, alpinism and ski touring courses is easier to handle both technically and in terms of safety. A group of eight people with two guides is better than a group of six people with one guide. Small groups receive more attention from the guide, who is able to help and teach each individual member based on his/her personal skills and pace. Interaction is more direct and immediate. Small groups mean greater costs, but improved risk management and a higher guarantee of success are worth the expense.

The Insurances

As mountain professionals, Alpine Guides have professional insurance coverage against civil and criminal liability and against expenses arising from rescue services from the place of accident to the closest hospital. In the event of an accident, the Guides’ rescue insurance covers the services provided up until the entry into the hospital. The Guides do not assume the civil liability of any of the participants. We recommend that each participant arrange for personal insurance for mountain activities without any limitations on the country or altitude as well as for insurance against injuries, covering expenses for inpatient hospital stays, hospital care and repatriation. Currently, in European Union Member States, hospital expenses fall within the framework of reciprocity in healthcare provision between the States and such expenses are thereby borne by the local health department of the patient’s country of origin.

Who are the Alpine Guides

The Alpine Guide would never have been without the attention of tourists alpine and on the other hand the latter could never satisfy their interest in discovering and conquering without the mountain. This link is at the basis of the mountaineering. Mountains have always been to high mountains for necessity, hunting, grazing, looking for crystals ... but mountaineering would hardly have entered their lives if there had not been a professional outlet.
The origins of the Alpine Guide were officially dated back to 1786 with the Mont Blanc conquest of Chamonix Jacques Balmat's crystallizer accompanying Dr. Paccard. But historical records dating back to the 12th century mention the existence of young valleys called "Marrons" accompanying pilgrims in the crossing of the Colle di Gran San Bernardo, and later, in 1588, in the conquest of Rocciamelone. It was then in Chamonix in 1821 and in Courmayeur in 1850 that the first two Alpine Guide companies were officially recognized by municipal regulations and regulations. From the "Royal Patents" to today's national laws of the Italian state No. 6 1989 and international, European legislation on the recognition of UIAGM (International Union of Mountain Guides Association) Alpine Guide craft has changed following the new trends but maintaining unchanged Its original spirit that consists in teaching art of mountaineering, mountaineering, climbing ... to enthusiasts of these disciplines. The legal rules regulating the profession of Alpine Guide The law of the state No. 6 1989 set new parameters for the exercise of the Alpine Guide profession by establishing a national college and a professional board and formalizing what competences and fields Of the Alpine Guide identified as:
1. It is a mountain guide who carries out, professionally, in a non-exclusive and non-continuous manner, the following activities: (a) accompanying persons on both rock and ice climbing or on mountain excursions; (b) accompanying people in ski climbing ascents or ski excursions: (c) teaching alpinism and ski - mountaineering techniques, excluding skiing techniques on downhill and cross - country skiing trails.
2. Professional pursuit of the activities referred to in paragraph 1, on any ground and without difficulty, and, for ski excursions, out of equipped ski resorts or downhill or cross-country trails, and wherever it may be necessary The use of mountaineering techniques and equipment, and reserved for alpine professional guides and registered in the professional alpine guides.

UIAGM - International Union Mountain Guides Association

He was born in 1965 in Zermatt, Switzerland. The UIAGM association, founded by the high mountain guides of France, Austria, Switzerland and Italy, has been in existence since 1965 and has a group of guides from over twenty countries of Europe, Asia, America and Oceania, for a total of around 6,000 guides. The purpose of the Statute of the Union was and is: - To comply with the national laws on alpine guides by providing a unitary vocational training, so that guides can also practice their profession abroad by presenting the international card - in the event of the need to make available an arbitration panel as a counselor or mediator in controversial matters (between members of the Union or between members and others); - study together problems related to the profession of alpine guide; - To make exchanges of experience and to encourage friendly relations between the alpine guides of all the associated nations To become UIAGM certified guide you are required a high level of competence, the highest existing, in four different disciplines: rock, ice, mountaineering, high mountain skiing. The formation of the UIAGM guides allows them to work on all the mountains, regardless of whether they are known or unknown. You need 5 to 10 years of mountaineering practice before you can get the driving degree. - Training guaranteed internationally. The UIAGM Technical Commission is composed of a permanent working group that allows you to study the evolution of techniques and improve the training level of the guides. This commission, made up of technical managers from different countries, meets twice a year. Guiding guides are relevant to any national association, sometimes in co-operation with educational institutions such as schools or universities. - The formation of the Alpine Guide The Alpine Guide is a professional whose skills have been certified. E ' capable of teaching and accompanying with prudence, responsibility and autonomy in the practice of the specific activities of the Alpine driving profession (in particular the mountaineering, the climbing, the sport climbing, the alpine skiing, the Off-piste skiing, ice waterfalls, hiking, high altitude shipments. Its minimum technical capabilities are evaluated by: - a rock climbing test with high mountain boots. (Diff. Min 5a); - a rock climbing test in climbing shoes. (Diff min 6b); - a progression test on ice with a spider, classical technique; - a progression test on ice with one or two small, frontal techniques; - an uphill skiing and downhill skiing test. This test is not contemplated in those states where there are no skiing activities. In addition to these technical disciplines, the Alpine Guide is evaluated on: - risk management, communication, relational capabilities; - technique and tactics of teaching and accompaniment; - methodology and didactics; - orientation and meteorology; - avalanche; - self-help and mountain rescue, first aid; - high altitude climbing; - nature and environment. The training is divided into three blocks articulated in: - entrance examination for technical skills; - Training and Evaluation for the Patent of Aspirante Guide; - training and evaluation for the Alpine Guide.